Beat the Heat in Cleveland

It is a beautiful week in Cleveland, showcasing all that Cleveland has to offer our RNC visitors. As the week progresses, temperatures are expected to rise into the 90s. The City of Cleveland and the American Red Cross would like to encourage all to remember the following information during hot weather:

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  • Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Remember to avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors that absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone, or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
  • Check on animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

Recognize and care for heat related emergencies …

Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen caused by exposure to high heat and humidity and loss of fluids and electrolytes. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.

Heat exhaustion typically involves the loss of bodily fluids through heavy sweating during strenuous exercise or physical labor in high heat and humidity.

  • Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale or flushed skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.
  • Move the person to a cooler place. Remove or loosen tight clothing and apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition.
  • If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, dial 9-1-1.

Heat stroke (also known as sunstroke) is a life-threatening condition in which a person’s temperature control system stops working and the body is unable to cool itself.

  • Signs of heat stroke include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting; and high body temperature.
  • Heat stroke is life-threatening. Dial 9-1-1 immediately.
  • Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the person’s body by giving care as you would for heat exhaustion. If needed, continue rapid cooling by applying ice or cold packs wrapped in a cloth to the wrists, ankles, groin, neck and armpits.

Find more information from the American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio at neoredcross.org.

About Dan Williams

Director of Media Relations for Mayor Frank G. Jackson, City of Cleveland

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