City Of Cleveland Launches Citizen Input Tool for American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Funding

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayor Frank G. Jackson launched the ReStart CLE efforts based on three overriding principles:

  1. To minimize the suffering and burden of people and businesses in our community who have been impacted by COVID;
  2. To better position all people and businesses in our community to take advantage of the recovery; and
  3. To make sure all people are better off as a result of the recovery efforts we undertake so that we can become a more equitable community.

The recently passed American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) provides a unique opportunity to build on these priorities and invest in Cleveland’s people, neighborhoods, and businesses. As a part of this nationwide effort, Cleveland will receive $511 million to help turn the tide on the pandemic, address its economic fallout, and lay the foundation for a strong and equitable recovery.

The City is collecting citizen input on how this money could be used to support the on-going economic recovery. Residents can submit ideas online at https://www.clevelandohio.gov/arpa or by using drop boxes at City Hall, their local neighborhood recreation center, or the Public Utilities Building at 1201 Lakeside Avenue. Additionally, all residents who receive a water bill will receive a questionnaire they can mail in or return to any of these locations.

This $511 million must be spent by December 31, 2024 and can be used, broadly, for certain types of programs or services, including:

  • Supporting Public Health Response – This includes things like funding COVID-19 mitigation efforts, medical expenses, behavioral healthcare, and certain public health and safety staff.
  • Replacing Public Sector Revenue Loss – Due to COVID-19, the City of Cleveland lost tax revenue which supports vital City services. These funds can be used to offset those losses and support direct services to people.
  • Address Negative Economic Impacts – During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people and businesses were hurt economically. These funds can help workers, families, small businesses, non-profits, and industries impacted by COVID-19.
  • Water, Sewer, or Broadband Infrastructure – This includes things like investing to improve access to clean drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure, and to provide unserved or underserved locations with new or expanded broadband access.