Mayor Jackson Introduces Healthy Homes Interdepartmental Initiative

The City of Cleveland launched last week its new Healthy Homes Interdepartmental Initiative, as part of its ongoing commitment to creating healthy homes in neighborhoods throughout the city. The proactive, multi-year program results from 1.5 years of internal planning and focuses on interdepartmental collaboration between Building and Housing, Public Health, Community Development, Law, Housing Court and multiple external partners.

Interdepartmental Collaboration

The City has removed silos and streamlined its responses to critical housing issues, including lead contamination. Part of the new collaboration includes a multi-faceted strategy designed to prevent illnesses related to the home environment; create an inventory of healthy homes and prevent health issues. This includes preventative education and outreach, rental registration and inspection, a searchable database, family resources, and lead poisoning prevention program. View video of a panel discussion with the five departments.

As part of the Mayor’s enhanced budget, the Department of Building and Housing will increase its budget by more than $1.9 million to add 33 employees including inspection staff and a lead specialist that will form the Rental Inspection Unit. The Department of Public Health will also increase its budget by more than $1.5 million and add 21 employees who will focus on multiple issues, including the prevention of lead poisoning.

Rental Registration

The program strengthens a rental registration process that already requires owners of rental units to register their units annually by subjecting them to a minor misdemeanor citation for failure to register. It also expands the definition of ‘rental unit’ to include units designed or intended to be used as a private residence regardless of whether the occupant pays rent. Third, it requires owners to allow inspections of their rental units in accordance with a rental unit inspection schedule.

Searchable Online Database

Families can now search online to find information about where homes marked as having lead hazards and other housing code violations are located. Search the portal here: https://ca.permitcleveland.org/Public/

Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

As part of the initiative, and as mandated by the State of Ohio, the City began a concentrated effort to placard homes beginning May 17. It has since placarded a total of 38 homes. Placarded homes are identified by the City as having lead hazards. They are determined to be unsafe for human occupation, especially for children under 6 and pregnant women. Placarding gives owners and tenants, who have been previously notified, “final notice” they must address the lead issue in the home before it becomes habitable.

Once placarded, a property must be immediately vacated until the lead hazard control order is brought into compliance. It is then validated by a third party who will conduct a lead clearance exam to confirm that the lead hazards have been remediated.

While the City does not cover moving expenses, it does provide guidance to families by connecting them to resources provided throughout the community.

Additional Strategies

The City also is working with representatives from the Ohio Department of Public Health to increase the pace of addressing uninspected homes. Mayor Jackson has also expressed formal opposition to the state amendment preventing local municipalities from addressing lead hazards and lead poisoning in their communities.

Starting in October 2015, the City also began working with additional external partners, including the Cleveland Tenant Organization, Cleveland Housing Network, Cuyahoga Board of Health, Environmental Health Watch, J. Aude & Associates and Spanish American Committee as well as academic partners, Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland State University, and Case Western Reserve University.

Cleveland Road Work Update: May 22, 2017

road work ahead

Thanks to Mayor Frank G. Jackson’s enhanced budget, made possible by Issue 32, the City of Cleveland is embarking on more street improvement projects in 2017 than years past. Projects span all neighborhoods and wards throughout the city.

Here are some highlights about this year’s road work:

  • Street resurfacing began on April 27, 2017 and will continue through the summer, weather permitting. The first resurfacing project took place in Ward 4 on Parkview Avenue near the intersection of Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard.
  • Potholes are serviced year round, weather permitting.  The Department of Public Works has increased its pothole crews from three to 10 as a result of the passage of Issue 32.
  • This year, with the completion of the Pavement Management Study we have a graded system that allows us to select the streets that are in the greatest need of resurfacing. We are using the worst first approach to road resurfacing.
  • We are projecting to resurface 95 streets this year.
  • Thanks to Issue 32 funds, the City of Cleveland has reinstated street sweeping services.

Click here to view today’s roads update.

Updates will be posted Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Mayor Jackson Announces Legislation to Address Unlawful Street Riding

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Mayor Frank G. Jackson and Cleveland Police Chief Calvin D. Williams announced this week that the City of Cleveland will introduce legislation to address unlawful dirt bike and off-road vehicle riding. Riders of dirt bikes and off-road vehicles are currently disrupting traffic flow on city streets and freeways.

“I have been working closely with the Cleveland Division of Police and leaders in the bike-life community to create alternatives for street riding and ensure the safety of police officers, residents, riders and our community,” Mayor Jackson said. “This legislation is part of a comprehensive plan to keep everyone safe, educate riders and enforce laws.”

The legislation will be introduced to Cleveland City Council before summer recess. And will include:

  • Prohibiting All-Terrain Vehicles or illegal (not properly licensed and equipped) Dirt Bikes on streets, sidewalks and in City parks and strengthening the penalties for violations.
  • Prohibit Road/Street stunts that compromise the flow of traffic.

“The Division of Police has been working with our law enforcement partners to construct a plan that will curb this illegal activity,” said Chief Williams. “It is our goal to move the riders off of our streets and address the issues of blocked and disrupted traffic and the concerns of residents. By educating riders and citizens and with the public’s assistance, this is certainly possible.”

The City supports legal recreation activities and is working with many of the street riders to find alternatives that promote this sport legally. One alternative is the multi-modal racing track at Marion Motley Park.

City leaders are also embarking on a joint effort with the Bob Burton Foundation to connect with the riding community. City leaders and members of the organization met with several members of the community to discuss plans that not only address illegal activity, but inform riders of the rules and regulations.

“We want to bridge the gap between youth/urban motorcyclists and other at risk youth with the community, including law enforcement,” said founder Johnnie Burton. “Our goal is to be the liaison who people trust to ensure fairness and safety for all involved.”

Watch the press conference here via TV20:

Cleveland Road Work Update: May 17, 2017

road work ahead

Thanks to Mayor Frank G. Jackson’s enhanced budget, made possible by Issue 32, the City of Cleveland is embarking on more street improvement projects in 2017 than years past. Projects span all neighborhoods and wards throughout the city.

Here are some highlights about this year’s road work:

  • Street resurfacing began on April 27, 2017 and will continue through the summer, weather permitting. The first resurfacing project took place in Ward 4 on Parkview Avenue near the intersection of Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard.
  • Potholes are serviced year round, weather permitting.  The Department of Public Works has increased its pothole crews from three to 10 as a result of the passage of Issue 32.
  • This year, with the completion of the Pavement Management Study we have a graded system that allows us to select the streets that are in the greatest need of resurfacing. We are using the worst first approach to road resurfacing.
  • We are projecting to resurface 95 streets this year.
  • Thanks to Issue 32 funds, the City of Cleveland has reinstated street sweeping services.

Click here to view today’s daily roads update.

Updates will be posted Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Cleveland Road Work Update: May 16, 2017

road work ahead

Thanks to Mayor Frank G. Jackson’s enhanced budget, made possible by Issue 32, the City of Cleveland is embarking on more street improvement projects in 2017 than years past. Projects span all neighborhoods and wards throughout the city.

Here are some highlights about this year’s road work:

  • Street resurfacing began on April 27, 2017 and will continue through the summer, weather permitting. The first resurfacing project took place in Ward 4 on Parkview Avenue near the intersection of Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard.
  • Potholes are serviced year round, weather permitting.  The Department of Public Works has increased its pothole crews from three to 10 as a result of the passage of Issue 32.
  • This year, with the completion of the Pavement Management Study we have a graded system that allows us to select the streets that are in the greatest need of resurfacing. We are using the worst first approach to road resurfacing.
  • We are projecting to resurface 95 streets this year.
  • Thanks to Issue 32 funds, the City of Cleveland has reinstated street sweeping services.

Click here to view today’s daily roads update.

Updates will be posted Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Cleveland Road Work Update: May 15, 2017

road work ahead

Thanks to Mayor Frank G. Jackson’s enhanced budget, made possible by Issue 32, the City of Cleveland is embarking on more street improvement projects in 2017 than years past. Projects span all neighborhoods and wards throughout the city.

Here are some highlights about this year’s road work:

  • Street resurfacing began on April 27, 2017 and will continue through the summer, weather permitting. The first resurfacing project took place in Ward 4 on Parkview Avenue near the intersection of Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard.
  • Potholes are serviced year round, weather permitting.  The Department of Public Works has increased its pothole crews from three to 10 as a result of the passage of Issue 32.
  • This year, with the completion of the Pavement Management Study we have a graded system that allows us to select the streets that are in the greatest need of resurfacing. We are using the worst first approach to road resurfacing.
  • We are projecting to resurface 95 streets this year.
  • Thanks to Issue 32 funds, the City of Cleveland has reinstated street sweeping services.

Click here to view today’s daily roads update.

Updates will be posted Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Mayor Frank G. Jackson’s Enhanced Budget Results in the Addition of 20 New Officers to Division of Police

Additional staff helps increase critical services to Cleveland neighborhoods

The City of Cleveland today graduated its 137th police academy class, adding 20 new police officers to serve citizens. The graduates are lateral transfer officers with prior law enforcement experience in the State of Ohio. The new staff is part of Mayor Frank G. Jackson’s ongoing plan to enhance the quality of life in Cleveland neighborhoods by reducing response times for critical services.

View images from the graduation ceremony.

“We are positioning for the future as we bring these 20 new officers into our police ranks,” said Mayor Jackson. “They are essential to strengthening our neighborhoods and providing a better quality of life for our citizens.”

Friends, family and city staff gathered to attend the graduation ceremony today at Cleveland City Hall. Along with Mayor Jackson, local officials included Police Chief Calvin D. Williams and Assistant Safety Director Tim Hennessey. The event also includes representatives from the State Highway Patrol, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Secret Service, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).

Mayor Jackson, who announced his 2017 budget enhancements in February, promised Cleveland residents enhanced critical services in area neighborhoods. Services such as police, fire and EMS all receive significant increases in staff and equipment as a result of Issue 32. The 138th police academy cadet class will commence in June 2017. The division is in the midst of ongoing recruitment. The force today is at 1,475 officers, and with the enhancements has a budgeted staffing level of 1,601, as some vacancies are often created through attrition.

“The addition of these police officers will help create an even stronger, more responsive police department for the people of the City of Cleveland, “said Chief Williams. “We’re hiring for the foreseeable future.”

The new Neighborhood Impact Community Engagement Squad (N.I.C.E) is included in the enhanced budget of approximately $8.3 million. As a result of adding new officers to the division, the NICE unit will gain 10 officers.